China to Impose Anti-dumping Duties on US and EU Caprolactam Imports

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Oct. 20 – China will start levying anti-dumping duties on imports of caprolactam – an organic compound that is used in the manufacturing of synthetic fibers – from the United States and the European Union, according to the Chinese Ministry of Commerce (MoC).

The MoC released the “Final Determination on the Anti-dumping Investigation into the Caprolactam Imports from the United States and EU (MoC Announcement [2011] No.68)” on October 18, announcing the collection of anti-dumping duties on imports of U.S. and EU-originated caprolactam will start on October 22, and last for the next five years.

The investigation – first launched in April 2010 – found that the caprolactam imports from those areas have caused substantial damage to China’s domestic industry.

The anti-dumping duty rates charged from seven EU companies and three U.S. companies – including DSM Fibre Intermediates B.V., Lanxess NV, DSM Chemicals North America, and Honeywell Resins & Chemicals LLC – will range between 2.2 percent and 4.9 percent, while the rates for other EU and U.S. companies will stand at 25.5 percent and 24.2 percent, respectively.

Caprolactam is initially used in the production of nylon 6. It is also widely used in the manufacturing of brush bristles, textile stiffeners, film coatings, synthetic leather and plastics.

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1 thought on “China to Impose Anti-dumping Duties on US and EU Caprolactam Imports

    Pondering says:

    I find this puzzling. Due to the high volatility and increase of cotton prices ( someone artificially maintaining high prices for cotton growers) some fabric suppliers in China which dealt mostly with cotton moved to synthetic fabrics. Surely this might hurt them more than the USA? Reduced fabric production will be followed by reduced garment production which is already hurt. Did I mention I find this puzzling?

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