Beijing Announces Wage Bases for 2011 Social Security Payments

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May 23 – Based on Beijing’s average annual wage level RMB50,415 in 2010, the Beijing Municipal Bureau of Human Resources and Social Security announced the wage bases for distinct employees’ social security payment in 2011.

For urban employees

  • For those who pay for their social security based on last year’s average monthly wage in the city, their wage base for this year’s payment stands at RMB4,201; for those who pay for their social security based on 70 percent, 60 percent or 40 percent of last year’s average monthly wage in the city, their wage bases for this year’s payment vary correspondingly, to RMB2,941, RMB2,521, or RMB1,680 respectively.
  • For those whose average monthly income last year was over three times more than the average in the city, their wage base for this year’s social security payment stands at RMB12,603.

For rural migrant workers

  • A rural migrant worker who enjoys basic pension insurance, unemployment insurance, work-related injury insurance, as well as maternity insurance shall define his/her social security payment base in line with his/her own average monthly wage last year. However, the total wage base cannot grow bigger than three times of last year’s average monthly wage in the city; the wage base for basic pension insurance and unemployment insurance payment shall not be smaller than 40 percent of last year’s average monthly wage in the city; the payment base for work-related injury insurance and maternity insurance shall not be smaller than 60 percent of last year’s average monthly wage in the city.
  • A rural migrant worker who enjoys basic medical insurance and pays for it at the rate of 1 percent, shall define his/her payment base at 60 percent of last year’s average monthly wage in the city.
  • A rural migrant worker who enjoys basic medical insurance and pays for it at the rate of 12 percent, shall define his/her payment base at the same standard as urban employees’.

For flexible employees

  • Those who pay for their basic pension insurance and unemployment insurance based on last year’s average monthly wage in the city shall pay RMB840.2 every month for basic pension insurance coverage, and RMB50.41 for unemployment insurance coverage; those who pay for the two types of insurance based on 60 percent or 40 percent of last year’s average monthly wage in the city shall adjust their payment proportionally.
  • Those who pay for their medical insurance but do not enjoy medical subsidies shall pay RMB205.88 for insurance coverage, and those who receive medical subsidies shall pay RMB29.42 for coverage.

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