China 2012: A Year in Review

The Complete ‘China 2012: A Year in Review’ Series

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Dec. 31 – Over the last week, China Briefing has published several specially-commissioned pieces written by well-known China writers to summarize the key events of 2012 and points to look forward to in 2013. The complete series is summarized and hyper-linked below for your convenience.

2012: A Year in Review by Malcolm Moore
Malcolm is the senior Beijing correspondent for the Daily Telegraph. In this piece, he discusses the implications of the Bo Xilai scandal, the once-a-decade leadership transition, and several government ministerial mergers he feels could take place in 2013. Continue reading…

China 2012: A Year in Review by Chris Devonshire-Ellis

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During this week, China Briefing is featuring a series of specially-commissioned articles from prominent China-based writers regarding their thoughts on the key developments in the country during 2012, and what lies ahead in 2013. Today’s article is written by Chris Devonshire-Ellis, founder of Dezan Shira & Associates, as well as founder and publisher of China Briefing. The complete “China 2012: A Year in Review” series can be viewed here.

Dec. 28 – In a year that has contained ample political nuances, from the fallout over Bo Xilai to the territorial disputes involving several islands, much that went on under the radar will, I feel, have rather more profound consequences. While media roared over the spats with Vietnam and Japan, perhaps rather more monumental changes were being honed on the anvils of Asian diplomacy. Indeed, 2012 was a banner year for the rather more subtle, yet continuing assimilation of China into Asian and international trade flows. It has gone unnoticed by many, yet the repositioning of China is already well under way. But first, let’s just look back in order to peek into the future. Continue reading…

China 2012: A Year in Review by Mishi Saran

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During this week, China Briefing is featuring a series of specially-commissioned articles from prominent China-based writers regarding their thoughts on the key developments in the country during 2012, and what lies ahead in 2013. Today’s article is written by Mishi Saran, author of “Chasing the Monk’s Shadow: A Journey in the Footsteps of Xuanzang” and “The Other Side of Light.” The complete “China 2012: A Year in Review” series can be viewed here.

Dec. 27 – A few months ago, I got an email from a Chinese acquaintance asking me for help. Doctors had diagnosed his friend’s elderly mother with lung cancer; the prescribed medication was known to be reliable, and cheaper if obtained from India.

Naturally, I called my own mother in Delhi, who knew a good pharmacist. The grateful Chinese couple took me out to lunch, though no medicines had yet materialized. We went together to the State Bank of India branch on Huai Hai Road in downtown Shanghai to transfer money to the Delhi pharmacist. Bank staff told me that many Chinese clients send funds to India to pay for such medicines. A day later, the Indian pharmacist confirmed the funds had arrived and a friend who happened to be travelling from Delhi carried the medicine to Shanghai shortly thereafter.

The point is this: Amid the rise and fall of China’s official diplomatic temperature with its various neighbors – in this case India – ordinary Chinese quietly go about the business of living and dying, getting sick, suffering heartbreak or looking for a laugh. They find solutions where they can, whatever the official rhetoric may be. Continue reading…

China 2012: A Year in Review by Helen Gao

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During this week, China Briefing is featuring a series of specially-commissioned articles from prominent China-based writers regarding their thoughts on the key developments in the country during 2012, and what lies ahead in 2013. Today’s article is written by Helen Gao, a freelance writer covering China-related topics, with an emphasis on social media and education. The complete “China 2012: A Year in Review” series can be viewed here.

Dec. 26 – When Sina Weibo was first established in 2009, its founder had to persuade celebrities to join the network in order to attract attention. In just three years, its popularity has exploded, with more than 300 million registered users in a nation with 540 million connected to the Internet. Often referred to as China’s Twitter, Sina Weibo, along with similar services offered by other Chinese web portals, has transformed Chinese social interactions in ways few had anticipated, and there is no better example of this than the eventful year of 2012. Continue reading…

China 2012: A Year in Review by Robert A. Kapp

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During this week, China Briefing is featuring a series of specially-commissioned articles from prominent China-based writers regarding their thoughts on the key developments in the country during 2012, and what lies ahead in 2013. Today’s article is written by Robert A. Kapp, president of Robert A. Kapp & Associates and former president of the U.S.-China Business Council. The complete “China 2012: A Year in Review” series can be viewed here.

Dec. 25 – The November accession of new figures to the very top political posts in the People’s Republic of China, and the re-election of U.S. President Barack Obama, have naturally given rise to a deluge of pregnant speculation over the future of U.S.-China relations and the future roles each country will play on the global front.

Since Deng Xiaoping launched China on the road to “Reform and Opening” in 1978, the two countries have grown densely intertwined. China is now the world’s second-largest economy, and will likely become the largest within 20 years. Continue reading…

China 2012: A Year in Review by Malcolm Moore

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During this week, China Briefing is featuring a series of specially-commissioned articles from prominent China-based writers regarding their thoughts on the key developments in the country during 2012, and what lies ahead in 2013. Today’s article is written by Malcolm Moore, the Beijing correspondent of the Daily Telegraph. The complete “China 2012: A Year in Review” series can be viewed here.

Dec. 24 – The year of the dragon, according to Chinese belief, is often unpredictable and bewildering. And so it has proved. We saw extraordinary escapes, unexplained disappearances, the downfall of a prominent politician, and riot-causing regional spats.

There were moments when it seemed as if the economy might come off the rails. At other times, it looked as if the Communist party might not be able to agree on its once-in-a-decade leadership reshuffle. If they looked to history, China’s leaders would not have been too surprised by the how the year played out. Previous dragon years have seen a British invasion of Lhasa, a civil war after the collapse of the Qing Dynasty, war with Japan, the Tangshan earthquake and the death of Chairman Mao. Continue reading…

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